Welcome to New Every Morning Patchwork and Quilting!

1930s Plus Sign Quilt

Welcome all!

Hi! I’m Allison. Soon after discovering the craft of patchwork quilting I was fortunate enough to join a local quilt group and took advantage of their beginners course. There was no stopping me after that! Nine years on and I’m still learning new techniques, being inspired by the creativity of patchwork quilters from all around the world and finding great satisfaction in cutting up fabric into little pieces and sewing them all back together to make something new! ๐Ÿ˜€

Now I not only make but also design quilts, write patterns and pass on the skills I’ve learned by teaching workshops.

This blog is a window into my patchwork quilting and the place where I love to share what I’m learning and what’s been inspiring me week by week. You’ll find links to other quilting blog posts, tutorials and a few other things besides in my blog posts. I do a happy dance every time I see that someone has clicked on a link ๐Ÿ™‚ It’s my aim to introduce you to the worldwide quilty community that has given me so much.

So, why โ€˜New Every Morning Patchwork and Quiltingโ€™? Well! I am a morning person so this verse from the Bible resonates with me – ‘The steadfast love of the Lord never ceases; his mercies never come to an end; they are new every morning; great is your faithfulness.’ (Lamentations 3:23).ย I can be up, cutting, piecing, pressing and quilting before sunrise! By the time daily family routine kicks-in Iโ€™ve had a satisfying, soul-feeding creative fix.

Do take a look through some of my blog posts while you are here, you might also like to link up with me on Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest.

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A cover for my ironing board and a full design wall

Are you prone to procrastination? It is my middle name! Generally fueled by fear of failure, I often procrastinate beyond the deadline to get the thing done. So it is with a ridiculous amount of pride that I now declare several years of procrastination over and my table-top ironing board’s new cover ready to use!

Ironing Board cover in situ by Allison Reid
The new cover – not too shabby even if I do say so myself! ๐Ÿ™‚

I reckon the ironing board must be nine years old – bought during my first ever trip to IKEA when our daughter started University. The original cover has been stained with unsightly brown scorch marks for many of those years. Even concern the marks might discolour some of my fabrics has not been enough incentive for me to overcome the fear I might not succeed in making a replacement!

I don’t know quite what got me to the point of overcoming the fear and the resulting procrastination but there was a moment earlier this week when I decided ‘enough was enough’.

Read moreA cover for my ironing board and a full design wall

Saturday Quilting Bring and Share (52)

Welcome to Saturday Quilting Bring & Share ๐Ÿ™‚ I hope you have an opportunity this weekend to work on a project – bring it a long to this virtual sew-in and share some of the topics and inspiration brought to our attention by the Worldwide Quilting Community. Do add your comments and topics for conversation in the comments box at the bottom of this page.

On Saturday afternoon I will be teaching the final two blocks of a skill-building sampler quilt we have been making at Purple Stitches’ Quilt Club. We are tackling a nine-patch block and a Dresden Plate. Here are ‘the one’s I made earlier’ samples I’ll be sharing with the class:

PS Quilt Club Dresden Plate and Nine Patch by Allison Reid

Read moreSaturday Quilting Bring and Share (52)

Choosing and stitching a walking foot quilting design

At last Saturday’s Beginners Course we reached the quilting stage of constructing our quilts. I demonstrated a few ideas for quilting using a walking foot eg. in-the-ditch, echoing, wavy lines… I’d had a think about how to quilt my version of the Dashing Stars quilt. In-the-ditch would work but I favoured stitching a quilting design over the patchwork to add ‘movement’, helping to take the eye roaming around the patchwork design. I considered a diagonal hatch across the quilt and considered curves, maybe echoing arcs or a swirl. Eventually I came up with stitching a large zig-zag down the centre of the quilt and then echoing the shape to either side.

Dashing Stars quilting diagram by Allison Reid
Quilting diagram. The thick black line represents the first zig-zag, the thinner green lines the lines of echo stitching and the pink dotted lines the chalk lines used to mark where the next quilting line should pivot.

Read moreChoosing and stitching a walking foot quilting design

Saturday Quilting Bring and Share (51)

Welcome to Saturday Quilting Bring & Share. I hope you have had a good week and you will have time for a some creativity over the weekend. Bring along your project(s) and share in the latest quilty conversations across the Worldwide Quilting Community. Do use the comments box at the bottom of this page to share your projects and add your thoughts and reactions to what has inspired you and caught your attention this week.

I’ve been busy preparing for the third class of the Beginners Course at Purple Stitches. This, the penultimate class, is all about basting and quilting. I’ve pin basted my Dashing Stars quilt ready for the quilting demonstration.

Dashing Stars (2) basted by Allison Reid

I decided it would be a great idea to use another quilt top to demonstrate basting. I could have picked any number of completed quilt tops from my UFO pile but no, I chose to use the #scrappytripalong2019 – the blocks needed to be sewn together, borders measured and stitched in place, the wadding cut, the backing fabrics chosen and pieced together… Oh! And a label made too! Well! It may have been a good idea… But…It took me all day Thursday to piece the top and faff about putting the backing together. Thankfully I had a piece of Quilter’s Dream Poly wadding just slightly larger than required. I pushed through, not only making the label but also machine stitching it to the backing ๐Ÿ™‚

Blocks stitched together and borders added.
Backing for Scrappy Trip Along Quilt by Allison Reid
#scrappytripalong2019 backing
Label made and stitched in place.

I’m really pleased with the pieced backing. It looks so simple yet it took me well over two hours to select the fabrics, cut them to size and stitch those l-o-n-g seams! I had a thoroughly satisfying day moving on the #scrapytripalong2019 blocks from the design wall to having a quilt top ready for basting although it really struck me just how long it takes to make a quilt! I guess when we make a few blocks here, a few blocks there and complete a quilt in our ‘free’ time we very quickly lose track of just how many hours it takes? I was amazed how the hours ticked by that day and by my consistent underestimating of how long it would take to complete each step!

We have a houseful of guests this weekend so my sewing room has morphed into a guest room. Once home from Purple Stitches I’ll be turning my hand to some hand stitching ๐Ÿ™‚ As luck would have it I started a little Blackwork bookmark project on Monday at our monthly craft group.

Blackwork bookmark by Allison Reid Elizabeth 1 wearing Blackwork by Allison ReidI like Blackwork, I first learned it as an off-shoot of cross stitch (my go to craft before I discovered patchwork). Blackwork (essentially filling stitched outlines with repeating patterns stitched in running stitch) has a long history and was particularly popular in Tudor times. Look at this portrait of Queen Elizabeth I, her sleeves and the bodice of her dress are covered in Blackwork. I found this portrait in a great book by Becky Hogg, published by the Royal School of Needlework in their Essential Stitch Guides series.

And moving smoothly (or should that be ‘seamlessly’?) into this week’s links:

I read in the March edition of ‘British Patchwork & Quilting’ magazine that the Royal School of Needlework have published embroidery courses online. Find out more at www.rsnonlinecourses.comย 

Christa Watson has been sharing how she plans out the quilting designs she stitches over her quilts. This is a really comprehensive guide given as a guest post on Amy Smart’s blog, Diary of a Quilter.

Shannon Brinkley loves to talk fabrics and colour. In this blog post she explains the virtues of ‘monochromatic prints’.

Bobbie’s post has lots of handy piecing tips. She shows us how to make the first block in a sewing themed mystery quilt. The first block is a sewing machine.

If you are in the USA and could be inspired to create a quilt to donate to one or other of the charities supported by Hands2Help you can find out more information from Sarah at her blog, Confessions of a Fabric Addict. Bernie gives a moving description of the work carried out by a hospital Palliative Care Team and the use they make of donated quilts.

Happy Stitching!

Allison