Footnotes – Face masks and applique circles

A short blog post – a round up of the projects left hanging in my previous post 🙂

I did get a bit of a face mask production line going on over the weekend. I settled on the reversible ‘New Design – DIY Breathable Mask with a Pocket‘ pattern. After making a couple I could remember the method without having to return to the YouTube video (which is just as well as the WiFi connection in my sewing room is rubbish!).

I’ve played around with the template a little, making it 1cm longer. And to finish each mask I top stitch the lower and upper edges to firm down the two layers of fabrics.

I asked readers of the Saturday Quilting Bring & Share blog post if they could recommend any mask patterns they had tried. Thank you to those who replied. Here are links to the recommended face mask patterns:

Once the masks were made I was glad to pick up my needle turn applique project – Basket of Blooms by Jo Avery. Time to try stitching down a small circle – finished size 1½” diameter. The detailed instructions and clear photos in my new book, ‘the Best-Ever Applique Sampler’ by Becky Goldsmith and Linda Jenkins were so helpful.

My Word for 2020 icon by Allison ReidMy finished shape certainly isn’t a smooth-edged, perfect circle but I’m satisfied with it and I’m absolutely sure it would have looked a lot rougher if I’d not followed the technique described in the book. I’m feeling in touch with GROW – my word of 2020 – as this project progresses 🙂

Linking with Dione at Clever Chameleon for Colour & Inspiration Tuesday and with Susan at www.quiltfabrication.com for Midweek Makers.

Allison

Jelly Roll Bargello Quilt – progress and a free pattern

My Word for 2020 icon by Allison ReidI’m making good progress with the Bargello quilt experiment.

The story so far: I’m using a Jelly Roll for fabric and have had a couple of attempts at designing and making blocks. My first pattern proved to be a bit too fiddly – for my tastes anyway – with the narrowest strips cut just ¾” wide. Before making the second block I changed the cutting measurements to no narrower than 1½” wide – much better! The thrid block I made was identical to the second… Or so I thought…. Doh! I mis-read my pencil pattern and had cut a couple of strips to the finished measurements with no seam allowances! A bit of unpicking had to happen! Thankfully there was enough left-over fabric for me to cut strips of the correct width to complete the block.

Then I had to bite the bullet and make the fourth block using my original narrow cutting measurements. When that  was made I could sew all four blocks together and stand back to see the pattern flowing over the quilt top. So this is a bit of an experimental quilt top. I’m pleased I achieved my aims of designing and making Bargello blocks AND in the process used all forty Width Of Fabric strips from the Jelly Roll.

Four blocks stitched together – 50″ x 40″

Bargello – it turns out not to be as scary as it looks! I thought I’d write up my cutting and piecing instructions and share them. If you’ve shied away from this block in the past why not give it a go using my pattern, Basic Bargello Block -July 2020? All you need are ten width of fabric strips cut 2½” wide. Follow the method shared in the pattern – looking back at the photo tutorial in my ‘Jelly Roll Bargello Quilt – first block, step by step‘ blog post should help – and give it a go! Ten WOF fabric strips will make a block measuring 28″ x 20″.

Basic Bargello Block – 28″ x 20″

Download the pdf Basic Bargello Block pattern here: Basic Bargello Block -July 2020

Let me know how you get on if you do give Bargello a try. Link up via my Facebook page, or use @allisonreid.neweverymorning on Instagram. I’d love to see versions of this pattern made in other colourways 🙂

Linking with Susan for Midweek Makers. Susan is busy designing rather than making at the moment but there are a whole host of bloggers from the Worldwide Quilting Community sharing their inspiring quilt projects in her link-up this week.

Allison

 

Jelly Roll Bargello Quilt – first block, step by step

My Word for 2020 icon by Allison ReidSo, designing and making a Bargello quilt, how hard can it be? 😀

There are plenty of Bargello patterns to be bought, found in books or available for free on the ‘interweb’… but none seemed to quite fit the fabric quantities I had available or the idea I had in my head…

Not only are there plenty of patterns available there are also a considerable number of cutting and piecing methods to choose from – both to follow in books and watch on YouTube. It took me a couple of days to assimilate the information I’d found, play around with pencil and eraser and look wistfully at the fabrics. Finally it was time to put a plan into action 🙂

Fabric: I used a Moda Jelly Roll, ‘Circulus’ by Jen Kingwell Designs, forty width of fabric strips cut 2½” wide. This collection conveniently has four each of ten colours making it easy for me to sort them into four matching sets. Other Jelly Rolls would need more careful sorting and maybe a few substitutions to replace those fabrics that wouldn’t play well in a Bargello pattern i.e. large, widely spaced designs which could break up the pattern across the quilt top.

The method: After much deliberation and many ‘huhs?’ followed by a few light-bulb moments I decided to employ a strip piecing ‘tube’ method to make this Bargello quilt. After all the research, I found most affinity with a tip-filled

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Quilter’s Color Quest: 5. All Colors In

All Colors In! Rachel Hauser’s latest Quilter’s Color Quest challenge is all about creating fabric rainbows. Using the My Word for 2020 icon by Allison Reidswatches provided with her book, The Quilter’s Field Guide to Color, the challenge is in three parts. First organise colours of the rainbow into four ‘families’: classic pure hues; pastel tints; dusty tones; and jewel shades. Hum! Hues, tints, tones and shades? I had to flick through the book to find an explanation of what these words actually mean…

    • Hue = a pure colour
    • Shade = hue + black
    • Tone = hue + grey
    • Tint = hue + white

Here are my swatch rainbows:

The second part of the challenge: choose one of the rainbows and expand it to twelve swatches in order to practice creating smooth transitions between colours. I decided to stay in my comfort zone and worked with ‘dusty tones’.

I’ve always been drawn to ‘dusty tones’ when choosing clothes or home decor. After ten years of patchwork quilting I realise I do enjoy playing with jewel shades too. Autumn is definitely my colour season though, so I guess that explains my ‘dusty tones’ preference. However, there are some deep ‘jewel’ colours associated with Autumn: I’m thinking berries, dramatic leaves and intense sunsets.

The final part of this challenge: to translate the swatches into fabrics and make the next batch of Bear Paw blocks.

Not surprisingly, I found a good supply of dusty tones in my scrap and stash bins! Although I couldn’t find a dark blue/purple fabric to match the ‘Midnight’ swatch card I’d chosen (bottom left of photo). Again, not surprisingly it was the purple scrap bin that provided me with the least choice of suitable fabrics (purple rarely features in my colour schemes!).

My ‘All Colors In’ Bear Paw blocks.

I’m learning so much through these challenges. As Rachel writes, ‘Color is about self-discovery. There is no ‘wrong’ – there’s just your personal preference’. I think being able to understand and articulate our color preferences using hands on experience along with accurate use of the language of colour has got to be an advantage when it comes to selecting fabrics and creating quilts that rest easy with ourselves or the recipient.

Allison