Quilter’s Color Quest Quilt Completed

My Word for 2020 icon by Allison ReidMy Quilter’s Color Quest quilt is finished! I have so enjoyed learning about colour by reading Rachel Hauser’s book, ‘A Quilter’s Field Guide to Color’. Working through the challenges presented in the book and via the Quilter’s Color Quest has helped me gain a better understanding of my own colour and fabric preferences. I feel much more confident about choosing fabrics, understanding much better why I’m drawn to some rather than others but also how to incorporate fabrics I might have rejected in the past into my future projects.

The Bear Paw blocks were such a pleasure to make. I decided to piece my 59 blocks into an on-point layout with narrow sashing to separate the blocks. I used unbleached calico for the background, all the Bear Paw fabrics were lurking in my stash or scrap bins.

The backing fabric was a gift brought back from a trip to SE Asia. I had to cut the length in half and join selvage edges together to make a piece the right width for the backing. I still can’t quite believe I managed to match up the two pieces of fabric so well – the seam is hardly visible, even if I do say so myself πŸ˜€

At 51″ by 71″ the quilt was a comfortable size to fit through Julie the Juki. I used a Hera Marker to establish the initial quilting lines across the pin basted quilt sandwich. One gently wavy line across the centre and another intersecting it were enough to begin the process of stitching out the wavy grid design. I used a walking foot with the line guide set to 2″ to make sure the echoed stitching lines were evenly spaced.

In the bobbin I used a light brown Aurifil 40wt thread, 2314, which blended well with the backing fabric. I chose a varigated Aurifil 40wt thread, 3817, for the top to give some colour to the plain calico setting triangles at the end of each row of blocks.

To finish the quilt I made a scrappy binding, machine stitching it to the back before folding it to the front and machine stitching it down.Β  I also made a label, this time stitching it into the binding before hand stitching the other two edges in place. (Here’s the link to a label making tutorial I shared earlier this year).

Last night a storm blew up, I crept downstairs, lifted the Bear Tracks and Big Dottie quilts from the sofas and laid them on top of our inadequate summer duvets. Perfect! We were quickly warm enough to go back to sleep! Makes me think I need to make a full size quilt for our bedroom… πŸ˜€

Linking this rare finish of mine with Michelle for the Beauties Pageant, Wendy for the Peacock Party and Alycia for Finished or Not Friday. As an introduction to Down Syndrome Awareness Month Michelle gives a beautiful account of being the parent of a child with the condition.

Allison

 

Saturday Quilting Bring and Share (225)

Welcome to Saturday Quilting Bring & Share. You are invited to bring along a project and share in some of the generosity and inspiration being posted by our Worldwide Quilting Community. Please do leave your links and contributions to the conversations in the Comments box at the bottom of this page. Thank you!

Snoopy Baby Quilt finished front by Allison Reid
My Snoopy Cot Quilt

Before I share my projects I’m going to share a story from the wonderful Community that exists around the craft of patchwork quilting: I was so touched to receive an email from Jana who has just finished a quilt for her first Grandchild. Jana’s daughter had asked for a Snoopy themed quilt in a very specific colour scheme. An internet search brought Jana to one of my blog posts featuring the Snoopy baby quilt I’d made for a friend, this became the inspiration for her quilt πŸ™‚

Jana wrote, ‘This is my second quilt but I made my first one 15 years ago so this should probably count as my first! Β This quilt was way beyond my skill set and I quickly realized that during the planning stages. Β I found wonderful help from my neighbor, who has her own studio, and she pointed me to a wonderful quilting community. Β I could not have done it without their help and YouTube.’

Jana’s Quilt with embroidered panels and perfect Flying Geese and star points!

I’m so happy Jana has discovered the Patchwork Quilting Community and I’m glad to say she is already collecting fabrics to make another quilt πŸ™‚

My sewing progress has slowed down this week but not completely stalled so I can report that I’m about 2/3rds of the way round stitching the binding to the Winnie-the-Pooh baby quilt (we watched Casablanca last night for the first time ever and I managed to keep stitching through most of it!). Quilting the wavy grid design over the Bear Tracks quilt is also progressing steadily – maybe about 1/4 of the quilting is complete. Thankfully it’s an easy design to do in short bursts. My machine is all set up and ready to go with the walking foot and line guide in position so I can disappear into the sewing room for 20 minutes at a time, stitch a couple of lines of the grid before getting back to other things that need doing around the house and garden.

Sorry for the poor picture quality – I forgot to take a photo during daylight hours!

No surprise that there’s lots of quilty goodness to share in this weeks selection from our Worldwide Quilting Community:

Patty has kindly shared a tutorial to make a baby quilt from a charm pack and a yard of background fabric. The layout of off-centre Half Square Triangles gives the quilt a modern ‘edge’ and allows for lots of fun arranging the HSTs by colour.

Have you tried taking part in an on-line class? I’ve yet to enroll in one but joining with others for a class or workshop from your own home sewing table is getting to be a real ‘thing’ after virtually all exhibitions, shows and shop based classes have been cancelled. Next month Christa Watson will be teaching three classes at the ‘Pacific International Quilt Festival On-line’. Click over to her blog post to read the details and find out about the enrollment procedure.

Christa is also starting a new series on her blog, called Machine Quilting Tips and Tricks. It’s well worth subscribing to her blog to receive the email notification when she publishes one of these posts.

I’m a bit of a sucker for star blocks! Sandra shares her latest quilt, made with large star blocks. She used a fat quarter pack of Blueberry Park fabrics and the quilt looks so fresh in green, blues and yellows. Sandra shares how she came to make a pieced back and her use of the ‘floppy feathers’ design in the quilting.

Have you noticed there is a lot of curved piecing being incorporated into modern quilt designs at present? If you fancy giving curved piecing a go then I recommend this photo tutorial by Leanne. She includes lots of useful tips and reaches out through the screen to hold hands through the curved piecing process πŸ™‚

Amy Friend is sharing a seasonal pumpkin pattern over on her blog page. The pumpkin is foundation paper pieced. Amy has used four of the pumpkins to make a cushion cover, they could also be used to make a table topper or place mats as well as being incorporated into a quilt.

Emily Dennis has built up a great set of patterns that all clearly share her design style and fabric choice. Her latest pattern is called ‘Glowing‘, comes in three sizes and is fat quarter friendly.

Another pattern launched this week is ‘Waterfall’ by Myra at Busy Hands Quilts. I really like the 3D effect Myra creates in her Log Cabin style blocks by her careful use of colour value.

Leah Day’s latest mini block tutorial shows how to make a Sugar Bowl block. The instructions lead to the making of two blocks at a time in reverse colourways. These could build into an intriguing patchwork pattern…

Linking with Alycia for Finished or Not Friday.

Happy Stitching!

Allison

Puffy borders, ‘seamless’ joins and undulating lines

Last weekend I shared the three projects that were ‘live’ in my sewing room. Progress has been made on two πŸ™‚

First up is the Winnie-the-Pooh baby quilt panel. I’d already quilted around the printed patchwork blocks – pseudo in-the-ditch. Since the weekend I’ve made the binding – four 2ΒΌ” width of fabric strips were just enough :-). Before attaching the binding I thought it would be best to flatten down the ruffled fabric of the printed borders.

I could have done some quilting but the aim of this project was to ‘keep it simple’ so I opted to stay-stitch about 1/8th inch in from the marked edges. I figured anchoring down the puffiness would reduce the risk of the excess fabric being pushed to the corners when the binding was being stitched in place. This would have created edges that wouldn’t lie flat and distorted the rectangular shape of the quilt.

I increased the machine stitch length from 2 to 5 and began stitching from the corners to the mid-point of each edge.

Midpoint of the bottom edge. Stay stitching started from the corners meets in the middle, creating a pucker or two…

At the midpoint I stopped stitching, broke threads and went onto the next corner, stitching down to the mid-point and stopping again. This shifted the excess fabric to the centre of each edge rather than pushing it out to the corners. A few puckers were created but I figured these were a reasonable compromise in the pursuit of keeping the whole quilt flat and with 90Β° corners.

Once the stay-stitches were in place I trimmed away the excess backing and wadding before attaching the binding to the front of the quilt.Β  As for puckers and pleats I’m pleased to say there are so few I’m pretty sure they will fly under the radar of the Quilt Police! πŸ˜‰ I’m looking forward to hand stitching the binding to the back of this little quilt.

On to project number 2the Quilters Color Quest scrappy Bear Tracks quilt. First job was to ‘re-size’ the backing fabric. The fabric was much longer than the quilt top but not as wide. I decided to cut it in half across the fabric width and stitch two long edges together. The tricky bit was stitching the two pieces together so the diagonal stripe pattern appeared unbroken. Two attempts, a bit of fiddling and lots of pins produced a happy result!

Really close inspection would show the little patterns within the stripes not quite matching but over all the stripes look unbroken πŸ™‚

I pin basted the Bear Tracks quilt yesterday afternoon. It took me a while to come up with a quilting design. I decided the Bear Track blocks would be difficult to stitch around or integrate into a design, better to go for an all over design that doesn’t relate directly to the blocks. I thought about straight parallel lines (a bit like tracks?) or a grid, finally coming up with a wavy line grid. I used a Hera Marker to ‘draw’ two intersecting undulating lines (don’t you just love the word ‘undulating’? I think Miranda Hart would enjoy playing with that word!). Once I’d stitched over the indents made by the Hera Marker (using Yvonne’s tip of directing light from the side to create a shadow) I fixed the line guide to my walking foot and made a start echo stitching the curvy lines.

My echos are two inches apart – I could be quilting for some time… So far, so good.

Linking with Susan for Midweek Makers.

Allison

Heavy Weather Bear Tracks

Oh! Dear! I have made very heavy weather of placing my Quilter’s Color Quest Bear Paw blocks on point! I decided to separate out the scrappy blocks by adding narrow sashing. That went OK! But my poor brain struggled to figure out the layout once it was time to introduce the setting triangles and stitch the rows of blocks to each other.

The puzzling Bear Paw blocks on-point but on their sides and confusing me!

Thankfully I did find a helpful guide to ‘Piecing On-Point Quilts’ on the quiltnotes.com website, giving details for creating on-point layouts with or without sashing strips. When I couldn’t visualise the layout the website photos and explanations kept me going, despite not being able to see where I was going – if you see what I mean! The website also has a very handy table giving the cutting dimensions for the setting triangle and corner triangle fabric – calculated for whatever size blocks are being used. I made triangles a bit bigger than necessary just to be sure there’d be some excess fabric all around the edge of the quilt top.

Sewing the rows together took a good deal longer than I’d estimated. This morning I sat down and stitched the final couple of long seams through the centre of the quilt top and added the little corner triangles. Now I can hang the quilt the right way up it all seems quite logical but when the layout was under construction, lying sideways-on on the design wall it really did give me trouble!

And now, I must ask you please not to judge me….

But, even in the midst of piecing the Bear Tracks quilt, I’ve started another project! πŸ˜€ This little project (at least I hope it is a little project) came about because I’ve been de-stashing.

I found the baby quilt panel and thought about adding it to the fabrics currently for sale in my Etsy Shop. However, the panel is produced by Disney and the message on the selvage clearly states it is ‘intended for non-commercial home use’. Rather than risk a legal tangle with such a mighty corporation I decided to make the panel into a quilt and keep hold of it as an item ready to gift. I plan to quilt it using a walking foot, just following the patchwork pattern printed on the panel – keeping it simple πŸ™‚

I found a piece of Civil War reproduction fabric that fits really well with the dusty colours of the panel and is just the right size to use as the backing. I had several off-cuts of Quilters Dream Green wadding stored away. I stitched three pieces together to fit this project. I hunted around for a green fabric to use as binding but couldn’t find the right shade in my stash. Using a Kona Solids colour chart I chose ‘Peridot’ as a good match and thankfully managed to order some from a UK store. Six months into the pandemic it’s not always possible to find specific fabrics or threads is it? I wonder how long it will be before production and supply chains are running as they were pre-Covid?

Linking with Kelly for Needle and Thread Thursday. Kelly has designed and finished a quilt – soon to be a pattern – and shares some of the quilts from last weeks link up.

Allison