Saturday Quilting Bring and Share (113)

Welcome to Saturday Quilting Bring & Share πŸ™‚ I hope you have had a good week and can enjoy some time being creative this weekend. Bring along your project(s), relax and enjoy some of the inspiration being shared by other members of our Worldwide Quilting Community. Do leave your thoughts and links in the comments box at the end of this page.

I have been steadily working away designing and making Bargello blocks using a Jelly Roll of rainbow fabrics designed by Jen Kingwell. See my Instagram feed, @allisonreid.neweverymorning, for the updates I’ve been posting through the week.

Rainbow strip sets lined up on my design wall.

I made four strip sets by dividing the Jelly Roll into identical groups of ten strips (see this post for the method I used). The first strip set made a block measuring 22″ wide by 20″ long. I like the block (top left in the photo below) but the construction was too fiddly with the narrowest segments finishing just Β½” wide. I went back to the graph paper and modified my design so no strips were cut narrower than 1Β½”, finishing 1″ wide. The revised design yielded a block measuring 28″ x 20″ (top right).

Today I made a second block (bottom right) using the revised design. And now I have a dilemma… I have one more strip set to make into Bargello block. Should I bite the bullet, go back to the first fiddly-twiddly design, make a block identical to the first and then join all four together? Or should I make a third block using the revised design and stitch the three together, keeping the smaller, original block as a wall hanging or table topper? Humm?

Enough of my dilemmas, here are some links into the inspiring Worldwide Quilting Community:

Michelle has had a positive experience donating a quilt to a charity auction and gives some thoughts on the process.

Christina Cameli has found herself editing her latest video class. All set up to record the class at home with Bluprint giving long distance support Christina found herself caught up in the ‘bitter lemon’ of Bluprint’s demise. Once over the shock she decided lemonade could be made from this situation and, aided by her daughter, Christina has filmed and edited the class πŸ™‚

A new book, ‘ Love Your Creative Space – A visual guide to Creating an Organised and Inspiring Studio Without Breaking the Bank’ is reviewed by Teri who has been taking on board lots of the advice and sharing some of the inspiration as she plans her new sewing room.

I have really enjoyed watching Yvonne Fuchs’ latest quilt taking shape. ‘Mum’s Garden’ is a modern design with curved piecing and a very unusual colour palette. Well worth a click and a long look πŸ™‚

Linking with Alycia for Finished (or Not ) Friday.

Happy Stitching!

Allison

 

6 thoughts on “Saturday Quilting Bring and Share (113)

  1. Bite the bullet and construct it like the first block and then put them all together. You will be happier with the project in the end! I love what you did. I’m too chicken to give it a try!

    Reply
    • Yes! I think you are right Terry, it would be more satisfying to join four blocks together. Why don’t you try making one Bargello block with some left over width of fabric strips? I will write up the cutting instructions for my simple Bargello block strip sets and post it on my blog πŸ™‚ No excuse then!

      Reply
  2. I love Bargello! Years ago I did some Bargello tapestry. I am truly inspired by your piecing Allison.
    I started a baby play mat this week, using some novelty fabrics I had been given. I thought they were cotton until my blocks disintegrated under the iron!! Obviously more poly than cotton. Now the iron has been cleaned and I will start again without the novelty fabrics. I really am learning something new every week!

    Reply
    • I’m glad you are being inspired Louise! I did a little Bargello cushion cover years ago – that was tapestry too. I can remember being intrigued by the pattern – I think it is the ‘movement’ that makes Bargello patterns so appealing.
      How annoying to have fabrics melt onto your iron! I have read you can test the fibre content of fabric by burning it – definitely need to do a risk assessment first though πŸ˜‰ Cotton will smolder whereas polyester will appear to melt.

      Reply

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