Puffy borders, ‘seamless’ joins and undulating lines

Last weekend I shared the three projects that were ‘live’ in my sewing room. Progress has been made on two 🙂

First up is the Winnie-the-Pooh baby quilt panel. I’d already quilted around the printed patchwork blocks – pseudo in-the-ditch. Since the weekend I’ve made the binding – four 2¼” width of fabric strips were just enough :-). Before attaching the binding I thought it would be best to flatten down the ruffled fabric of the printed borders.

I could have done some quilting but the aim of this project was to ‘keep it simple’ so I opted to stay-stitch about 1/8th inch in from the marked edges. I figured anchoring down the puffiness would reduce the risk of the excess fabric being pushed to the corners when the binding was being stitched in place. This would have created edges that wouldn’t lie flat and distorted the rectangular shape of the quilt.

I increased the machine stitch length from 2 to 5 and began stitching from the corners to the mid-point of each edge.

Midpoint of the bottom edge. Stay stitching started from the corners meets in the middle, creating a pucker or two…

At the midpoint I stopped stitching, broke threads and went onto the next corner, stitching down to the mid-point and stopping again. This shifted the excess fabric to the centre of each edge rather than pushing it out to the corners. A few puckers were created but I figured these were a reasonable compromise in the pursuit of keeping the whole quilt flat and with 90° corners.

Once the stay-stitches were in place I trimmed away the excess backing and wadding before attaching the binding to the front of the quilt.  As for puckers and pleats I’m pleased to say there are so few I’m pretty sure they will fly under the radar of the Quilt Police! 😉 I’m looking forward to hand stitching the binding to the back of this little quilt.

On to project number 2the Quilters Color Quest scrappy Bear Tracks quilt. First job was to ‘re-size’ the backing fabric. The fabric was much longer than the quilt top but not as wide. I decided to cut it in half across the fabric width and stitch two long edges together. The tricky bit was stitching the two pieces together so the diagonal stripe pattern appeared unbroken. Two attempts, a bit of fiddling and lots of pins produced a happy result!

Really close inspection would show the little patterns within the stripes not quite matching but over all the stripes look unbroken 🙂

I pin basted the Bear Tracks quilt yesterday afternoon. It took me a while to come up with a quilting design. I decided the Bear Track blocks would be difficult to stitch around or integrate into a design, better to go for an all over design that doesn’t relate directly to the blocks. I thought about straight parallel lines (a bit like tracks?) or a grid, finally coming up with a wavy line grid. I used a Hera Marker to ‘draw’ two intersecting undulating lines (don’t you just love the word ‘undulating’? I think Miranda Hart would enjoy playing with that word!). Once I’d stitched over the indents made by the Hera Marker (using Yvonne’s tip of directing light from the side to create a shadow) I fixed the line guide to my walking foot and made a start echo stitching the curvy lines.

My echos are two inches apart – I could be quilting for some time… So far, so good.

Linking with Susan for Midweek Makers.

Allison

7 thoughts on “Puffy borders, ‘seamless’ joins and undulating lines

  1. Great progress on all 3 quilts. Nice close up and explanations of how you handled the excess fabric on Pooh quilt.
    Innovative quilting for bears paw quilt.

    Reply
  2. You are moving right along, Allison! Love how you managed to piece the backing together so well! I would’ve thrown my hands in the air, and just went with whatever! Well done! 🙂

    Reply
    • That backing going together so well took me by surprise! I don’t think I would have had many more attempts at it. My back up plan was to stitch a piece of fabric between the two halves so no matching would be required!

      Reply
  3. Good for you getting that backing seam to behave! I like your quilting idea. I had been wondering how to quilt Bear Paws and a quick search on the Internet wasn’t helpful, so thanks for the idea of an all over design. For a tiny quilt with just a few blocks (and pretending they were leaves) I sewed “veins,” but that would be a pain for a whole big quilt.

    Reply
    • Stitching leafy veins in Bear Paw blocks is a great idea but as you say maybe not when there are a lot of blocks to stitch! I’m glad the all over quilt design has given you inspiration for your quilt 🙂

      Reply

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