Ordinary People Chosen to Create History

The Bible is an amazing witness to God’s ultimate plan to reconcile wayward humans to Himself.

Through Advent I’ve been following daily notes* exploring the book of Ruth. Just a few pages long, the book is tucked away in the Old Testament. Ruth was not a Jew but she married a Jewish man, an economic migrant, who died after ten years of marriage. Childless, Ruth and her Mother-in-Law, Naomi, were in a precarious position both socially and economically. Ruth opted to leave her homeland, moving with Naomi to the land of Israel, declaring, ‘Your people will be my people, and your God will be my God’. The book of Ruth ends with the marriage of Ruth to a kinsman of Naomi and the birth of a son, Obed. Obed was Grandfather to King David. Ruth isn’t remembered just for being the Great-Grandmother of King David though, she is, through David and subsequent generations, a direct ancestor of Jesus (the family genealogy is recorded in the New Testament Gospel of Matthew, Chapter 1). The book of Ruth, the simple recounting of the lives of ordinary people living more than a thousand years before the birth of Jesus, is a wonderful illustration of God’s plan weaving history towards the perfectly timed birth of Emmanuel (God With Us).

John, writing as a first-hand witness of Jesus’ ministry recorded these words (John 3:17):

God did not send his Son into the world to condemn, but to save it.

God’s perfect plan of reconciliation and redemption revealed in the person of Jesus. Happy Christmas!

Allison

*Finding Hope Under Bethlehem Skies by Robin Ham

 

 

 

Finding the right colours for borders

Phew! I have finalised my selection of fabrics for the borders of the Pieces of the Santa Fe Trail quilt. Thankfully it hasn’t involved the purchase of too much extra fabric. A total of one metre divided into two quarter and one half metre pieces. A quarter metre of grey for the narrow inner border; some extra of the dark blue for the second border & the binding; and a quarter of the rusty red to complete the sashing strips.

Here are my mock ups on EQ7 complete with colour changes:

 

And here’s how it all looks for real up on my design wall:

I’m planning to use the discarded pinky-peach sashing and excess fabric in a pieced backing. Funny how finishing a scrap quilt involves buying new fabric! If only I’d made the right fabric choices at the start πŸ™„

Never mind, I’m much more motivated to proceed now I’m happy with the colours of the fabrics.

Linking with Judy for Design Wall Monday and Beth for Monday Making. They’ve both been making place mats ready for Christmas and have plenty of interesting posts to click to from other quilty bloggers who’ve joined in with their link-ups.

Allison

Saturday Quilting Bring and Share (277)

Welcome to Saturday Quilting Bring & Share. Bring along your project(s) and click the links to enjoy the sharing going on in our Worldwide Quilting Community. Join in the with the Community by leaving your comments in the discussion threads on the blog pages you visit πŸ™‚

Hmm! I’m not at all sure about my choice of colours for the sashing and cornerstones of the Pieces of the Santa Fe Trail quilt 🀨 The colours looked OK on my EQ7 mock up but of course they are approximations… The actual fabrics appear more rusty red and salmon pink than theΒ  shades of orange I’d been imagining.

Melva (designer of the QAL) took a look at the photo I posted on Instagram and messaged that with a blue border it should work… I’m hoping the broad, mainly blue outer border will throw attention on the blocks and suppress the sashing. We shall see! The fabrics are cut now so the options are: 1. to carry on or 2. face a trip to that UFO Cupboard of Shame 😱

The Following Day: I’ve moved on to a third (expensive) option 😌 I looked at the design wall this morning and decided the sashing hadn’t grown on me at all, quite the reverse. I experimented with some strips of golden yellow fabrics before trying strips of the cornerstone rusty red fabric. I’m surprised the darker strips seem to be a preferable option although I’m still not convinced… Whatever I decide will now involve buying even more fabric to finish a scrap quilt!

Back to UFOs, well things of outer space anyway. I’m listening to the autobiography of NASA’s Flight Director, Gene Kranz. You may have seen his character depicted in such films as ‘Apollo 13’ or ‘First Man’. Gene Krantz is the chap in Mission Control who dons a white waistcoat at the start of the manned rocket launches. His book, ‘Failure is Not an Option‘, is a fascinating listen. I can’t claim to follow all the technical stuff (although it is written to be accessible) but the background story to getting humans into space is remarkable. I’m in awe of the people who pushed the boundaries of knowledge and the men who basically sat on top of World War 2 German V2 rockets in order to be propelled out of the Earth’s atmosphere. Quite amazing!

Saturday Quilting Bring & Share posts may be a bit intermittent over the coming month but I intend to get the schedule back on track in the new year πŸ™‚ Here are a few links to distract you from your Christmas preparations:

Sheila Christensen is launching her online ‘Modern Triangle Sampler’ course. Participants will have access to Sheila’s videos sharing all her expertise in cutting and making triangle blocks without templates or Y-seams. She is offering two options for the course quilt.

Have you made a Plaid-ish quilt? The design crops up fairly often in my Instagram feed and it’s definitely on my list of quilts to make. The Plaid-ish tutorial was first published in 2019 by Erica Jackman of Kitchen Table Quilting. You can download the pattern for free here.

Something else that catches my eye as I do the Instagram scroll are jackets made from quilts. Now, I’m no dress-maker but I am tempted by these especially as I have a large quilt that is not being used. I made it a few years ago as an entry for the Festival of Quilts challenge. It’s too big to work as a throw so I have no qualms about cutting it up. Alison Stothard @hexadoodlequilts shared her first version of the Paola jacket, a free pattern from the Fabric Store. That got me searching ’til I found another jacket pattern, the Tamarack Jacket by Grainline Studio. I found there is series of tutorials on the Grainline Studio blog page, maybe I could have a go? The website is full of helpful information – a good one to favourite I think πŸ™‚

I had better stop dreaming of future projects, press the ‘publish’ button and acknowledge it is time for a reality check – go clean the bathroom πŸ˜›

Happy Stitching!

Allison

A negative sandwiched between two positives: Overcoming the deadline blues

A sandwich of a blog post – two positives surrounding a rather negative filling!

First positive layer:

Here is the progress I’ve made with a couple of the projects I have on the go:

  • Pieces of the Santa Fe Trail Sew Along: I made the twelfth and final block. Came home from Purple Stitches with fabrics for the sashing and cornerstones… I hope the rusty orange will provide enough of contrast without being a distraction from the blue blocks 🀞

  • English Country Garden cushion covers: Finished! 😁

The negative filling:

I’ve been getting a little stressed by deadlines lately. Not quite sure why, but I’m the run-up to Christmas (complete with it’s own set of requirements combining deadlines and perfectionism) along with heightened anxiety around Covid infection rates as invitations to social events begin to mount up are two of the causes. In my more rational moments I’ve been able to make sensible decisions about what to do and what to let slip but then (especially when I get tired) I have other times when I get overwhelmed and can think of nothing more appealing than shutting myself in my sewing room and not venturing out again until 25th December (when all the deadlines will have gone away!).

Bernie the Bernette

My coping methods at such times are unhealthy and expensive. On Thursday I ate so many biscuits I could hardly face my dinner and last weekend I blew my money on a whim – purchasing a sewing machine 😳 Totally mad! I decided I really needed a small, easily portable machine for sewing days. I chose a Bernette B35 which is a mechanical machine so it’s uncomplicated with no computerized workings to go wrong. When it arrived I felt ashamed of such an indulgence, leaving the box unopened under my sewing table for a couple of days! I have now unboxed the neat little machine, read the instruction leaflet, played around with a few scraps of fabric getting a feel for how it runs. Of course, one purchase leads to another, so I have ordered a quarter inch foot and a walking foot to add to the accessories kit…

Through the past two weeks I have continued to sew, but I have not been reading blog posts. My inbox reached overwhelm, social media was getting me down – so many Black Friday deal messages that any normal, friendly sewing messages were just lost in the deluge. And that left me feeling quite disconnected, lonely in fact. Does that make sense? Perhaps I was experiencing the virtual equivalent of feeling very lost and alone in a large crowd?

Anyhow, on Thursday I reached the bottom of the low, being overtired after a busy start to the week, I hit the biscuits, struggled to share a pot of tea and conversation with my lovely parents, fell asleep with my head on a table, woke up just in time to cook a dinner I didn’t want to eat, went out to a meeting only to find it had been cancelled (I’ve since found the 3 day old cancellation notice on Facebook – Facebook notifications are not a reliable means of communication), came home, escaped into my sewing room (again) before sloping off to bed.

Second positive layer:

Thankfully, a good sleep and a gracious God provided me with a New Morning on Friday. I finished stitching the walking foot quilting designs on the Modern Fans quilt – looking good even if I do say so myself πŸ˜‰

– then pottered around doing a few chores before donning my weatherproofs and setting out to hand-deliver a card to a friend. Despite being elbow deep in pumpkin flesh she kindly welcomed me in for a cup of coffee and we had a good chat as we watched the birds flitting around her garden.

Strava tells me my walk was a 5.6 mile round trip, surely long enough to get a good dose of positive-vibe endorphins circulating through my system?Β 

Have you been experiencing emotional ups and downs? Has patchwork quilting or another creative activity helped you to steady your thoughts, regain perspective or give you respite from a difficult situation?

Linking with Alycia for Finished or Not Friday and with Gail who is hosting TGIFF (Thank Goodness It’s Finished Friday).

Allison