Saturday Quilting Bring and Share (245)

Welcome to Saturday Quilting Bring & Share 🙂 I wonder what projects you’ll be bringing along this weekend? I hope you have time to be inspired by sharing-in some of what’s going on in the Worldwide Quilting Community. Click on the links in the section below for the quilty goodness. Leaving comments on the blog pages you visit will be a real encouragement to the writers.

I got well and truly swept away by a squirrel project this week. I started out making a basket and pincushion set as a gift and ended up making several more sets to list in my Etsy shop! (I also posted a basket making tutorial here). So it’s no great surprise I’ve made very s-l-o-w progress on the English Country Garden QAL Poppy block. I’m beginning to think I should be employing machine applique rather than hand

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Table Top Sewing Basket Tutorial

Hand sewing projects have the great advantage over machine sewing of generally being mobile activities. Even if ‘mobile’ only means moving from room to room or sofa to armchair within the home! Which is basically as mobile as sewing projects can be in current Covid restricted circumstances! Of course being mobile, even in this limited sense, does raise the need for some sort of container to carry and store sewing notions.

I had the perfect container hidden away on a shelf in my sewing room – a little fabric basket just the right size for the threads, needles, scissors and other bits and bobs I need for English Paper Piecing and applique projects. As well as being a useful container for carrying all the notions the basket also serves as a way to keep them all safely in one place – rather than thread spools rolling off the coffee table and my scissors getting lost between the sofa cushions!

Realising how useful the fabric basket has been to me over the past few weeks I decided I would make one as a gift for someone who is about to recommence home sewing after a long break. I’m really chuffed with the little basket and matching pincushion I made from a fat quarter and a few smaller scraps.

My word for 2021 is SHARE and in that spirit I thought I’d post a tutorial should you feel inspired to make a Table Top Sewing Basket 🙂 I certainly wouldn’t claim that this is an original idea. I first made a fabric basket back in 2014. I can’t remember the tutorial I followed. If  ‘make a fabric basket tutorial’ is typed into a browser the choice is overwhelming! Overtime I’ve adapted that first tutorial, introduced ideas from other basket tutorials and tried different combinations of materials. So this is a hi-bred of several tutorials and plenty of experience 🙂

To make a basket with a 4½” (11cm) square base that stands 4½” high you will need:

  • One Fat Quarter cut into: one (1) 5¾” x 20″ rectangle; two (2) 4¼” x 7″ rectangles
  • Contrast fabric: one (1) 1¾” x 20″ rectangle.
  • Lining: Two (2) 9½” x 7″ rectangles.
  • Medium weight iron-on interfacing (optional): one (1) 5″ x 19″ rectangle.
  • Wadding: one (1) 9″ x 22″ rectangle.

Step One – Preparing the Outside of the Basket

  • Using a ¼” seam, stitch the contrast fabric rectangle to a long edge of the 5¾” x 20″ rectangle. If either of your fabrics are directional be sure to orientate them correctly with the contrast fabric at the top of the basket! Press seam open.
  • Fuse the iron-on interfacing to the back of the pieced rectangle.
  • Lay the pieced rectangle face up on top of the wadding. Baste the two layers together. Try using masking tape to keep the wadding slightly stretched and in one place whilst lightly pinning the pieced rectangle in place.

  • I could write ‘quilt as desired’ and imagine the howls of frustration 😀 so instead I’ll just say that I generally choose to use a walking foot to stitch gentle wavy lines along the length of the piece. But if you are keen to practice free motion quilting stitches then a project this size is ideal! Keep the stitching lines about ½” – ¾” apart to help give the basket a bit of extra rigidity.
  • Once quilted use a rotary cutter to trim away the excess wadding.
  • Cut the quilted rectangle into two (2) 7½” x 9½” rectangles.

Step 2 – Making Boxed Corners

  • Place the two quilted rectangles right sides together. Use a ruler and pen to mark a 2¼” square in the lower left and right hand corners.

  • Line up the seams and pin. Stitch the two pieces together using ¼” seam. A walking foot is useful for getting through all the layers. Use strengthening back stitching at the start and end of each seam AND over the drawn lines.
  • Use scissors to cut out the marked 2¼” squares.
  • Fold one cut corner so the side and base seams are lying together.

  • Pin in place and sew along the opening using a ¼” seam, back stitch the start and end of the seam.

  • Repeat with the opposite opening.
  • Turn right sides out.

Step 3 – Make the Lining

  • Place the two Lining rectangles right sides together. Use a ruler and pen to mark a 2¼” square in the lower left and right hand corners.

  • Stitch the two pieces together using a 3/8″ seam. Leave a 2″ opening in the bottom seam. Use back stitching at the start and end of each seam AND over the drawn lines.
  • Use scissors to cut out the marked 2¼” squares.
  • Make boxed corners in the same way as for the Outer Basket.
  • Finger press the seams open and leave the lining wrong side out.

Step 4 – Make the Tab Handles

  • Place a 4¼” x 7″ rectangle wrong side up on an ironing board. Fold the shorter sides to the centre. Press to crease the folds. Fold along the centre line to make a 1¾” x 4¼” rectangle. Press the folds.

  • Top stitch close to both long edges of the rectangle.

  • Repeat with the second 4¼” x 7″ rectangle.

Step 5 – Constructing the basket

  • Place the Outer Basket inside the Lining, right sides facing with the side seams against each other.
  • Fold a Tab Handle in half widthways and slip it between the Outer Basket and Lining layers so it is centred on the side seams. Allow the raw edges of the Tab Handle to protrude ¼” above the rim of the basket. Pin securely in place.

  • Repeat with the second Tab Handle on the opposite side of the Basket.
  • Pin the Lining and Outer Basket together all around the rim. (This might be a bit of a tight squeeze as the Lining is shorter than the Outer Basket).
  • Stitch a ¼” seam inside the rim – a walking foot is useful for stitching through all the layers.

  • Use the gap in the bottom seam of the Lining to turn the basket right sides out.
  • Hand or machine stitch closed the gap in the bottom seam of the Lining.
  • Roll and pin/clip the rim of the basket so the seam is uppermost.

  • Top Stitch ¼” below the rim to hold the layers in place and create a neat edge.

I hope you enjoy making, using and/or gifting a Table-Top Sewing Basket. Any questions? Pop them in the Comments box and I’ll do my best to help.

One last tip: Best not to use a bag wadding such as Bosal In-R-Form for a small basket like this one. I did once and turning the bag right side out was very difficult – a bit of a Call the Midwife situation if you know what I mean? :-O

Linking with Alycia for Finished or Not Friday and with Denise for her Put Your Foot Down linky.

Allison

Saturday Quilting Bring and Share (244)

Welcome to Saturday Quilting Bring & Share 🙂 Bring along your projects(s) and be part of the sharing going on in our Worldwide Quilting Community. Join in by leaving encouraging comments for the blog writers you visit via the links below.

How has your week been? We had very little snow here just a freezing East wind that made facemasks a practical outdoor accessory! Brrr! A good week for getting on with projects indoors. Yesterday I shared my first attempt at adding a flange into a border seam. I’m pleased with how it turned out. The Basket of Blooms applique block plus borders now measures 24″ square. I think that makes it a wall hanging rather than a cushion cover! I’ve cut backing fabric and a piece of wadding to size, ready to baste into a mini quilt sandwich. The plan is to hand quilt the background. I’m not sure how to fix it as a hanging… I don’t think I’ll add loops to hang it from a pole… So I’ll have to investigate other options. Do you have a favourite method for fixing fabric wall hangings to the wall?

I’ve received some happy post this week 🙂 Several spools of 60wt Mettler thread to add to my small collection of applique/EPP threads and a copy of Love Patchwork & Quilting magazine. I took out the subscription when one of those ‘too good to miss’ deals flashed up on my Instagram feed. I have a vested interest in this title as one of my designs will feature in a forthcoming edition 🙂 Should I take a bow? 😀

Thread buying was prompted by participation in the English Country Garden QAL. Today I settled down in front of my laptop with my basted EPP shapes and stitched along with Alison as she live-streamed her regular Saturday morning programme, Hexadoodle Quilts, on Twitch TV.

My EPP poppy.

Alison demonstrated how to whip stitch the pieces together and later showed how to use a printed template to accurately place the pieces on the background square. I’ve appliqued four leaves in place so far… This is a quilt-as-you-go project so once the shapes are stitched in position it will be time to make a sandwich and quilt the block. I haven’t decided on backing fabric yet…

My projects for this weekend are to baste the Basket of Blooms wall hanging and continue working on the applique stage of the English Country Garden Poppy block.

Here are the links to the patchwork quilting community, I hope you’ll be learning and finding inspiration with each click:

Melva’s long running series linking the letters of 2nd World War POWs to patchwork blocks is coming to a close. It has been fascinating to read about the aftermath of war described by first hand witnesses. In this post Melva shares a letter from a German ex-POW who returned to Germany longing to be reunited with his family only to end up in a Russian labour camp. All these letters shared by Melva are a raw reminder that the deprivations of war last many decades beyond the signing of a peace treaty.

The Happy Scrappy quilt pattern was shared by Alyce at the start of the pandemic as a way of uniting quilters from around the world. It was a gentle scrappy QAL designed for short bursts of stress-free piecing without the need to go out fabric shopping. Over 400 quilters took part! In this gallery post Alyce shares a few of the quilts and flimsies that have been completed – so many colour schemes and pattern adjustments to compare and enjoy 🙂

Jayne has put in a sustained effort to de-clutter her sewing space. The results are striking and maybe an encouragement if you are thinking it’s time to tackle clutter around your sewing machine!

Lately I’ve been paying particular attention to applique projects and how they are quilted. Gretchen’s quilt top looks stunning. I especially like the way her quilted feathers weave behind the applique flowers. I’ve definitely been inspired!

Flying Geese are such a staple of patchwork and yet piecing these blocks can be quite a frustrating process. Yvonne Fuchs is into precision and her beautifully photographed No-Waste Flying Geese tutorial is full of tips to ensure the production of uniform, on-size Flying Geese. Well worth a careful read and a save to Pinterest!

Sandra hosts the monthly squirrel link up and of course she does this because she is prone to more than an occasional squirrel project! Her latest was inspired by a holiday photo – such as amazing beach scene – using a machine applique technique. Her mini-quilt clearly depicts the beach glass Sandra loves to collect. I wonder if anyone else will be inspired to try this technique taught by Allie @exhaustedoctupus?

Patchwork clothing is definitely ‘a thing’ right now. Lissa has cut into an old quilt to make a new jacket. That was brave but so much better than the intended destination for the quilt!

Linking with Alycia for Finished or Not Friday which has a heart theme in keeping with Valentines Day weekend.

Happy Stitching!

Allison

Adding flanges to a border

The Basket of Blooms applique is continuing to give me opportunities to learn and practice new techniques. This week I made the yo-yo embellishments. First time making these and maybe not entirely successful as the holes in the centres look rather large – perhaps I should have used smaller stitches so they’d gather-in more tightly?

I poked a little piece of the brown fabric into the yo-yo to make the opening less obvious!

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